Behold North Korea’s Bizarrely Majestic Bus Stops

Flip through photos that show the quirky beauty of the stops and the people who are waiting there.

01-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 9, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang. Buses are by far the most common means of public transport in the capital of around three million people, where access to private cars is rare, and offer the most extensive network. Tickets cost 5 won each less than 0.1 US cents at free-market rates, making journeys virtually free. The city is one where everyone almost always appears to have a purpose, whether going to or from work, or taking part in some kind of group activity. At bus stops, though, commuters are forced to disrupt that process as they wait for a vehicle. It is a moment that reveals their private interests whether talking to friends and colleagues, pensively watching the world go by, or sometimes playing with a smartphone. / AFP PHOTO / Ed JONES (Photo credit should read ED JONES/AFP/Getty Images)

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

02-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 7, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

03-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 9, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 10, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 9, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 7, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 8, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 9, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 10, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 9, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 11, 2017 a woman uses a mobile phone as she waits at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

12-north-korea-bus-stops In a photo taken on April 7, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 10, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 9, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 8, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stop In a photo taken on April 11, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stops In a photo taken on April 8, 2017 commuters wait at a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty

-north-korea-bus-stops A photo taken on April 8, 2017 shows a bus stop in Pyongyang.

Photograph by Ed Jones, AFP/Getty
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In the same country that is often demonized for human rights abuses and that regularly threatens to launch nuclear missiles at the rest of the world, its citizens spend much of their time doing a familiar, mundane activity: waiting for a bus.

These images by Ed Jones capture North Koreans as they wait at bus stops in the capital of Pyongyang. The same focused but slightly bored expression of urban bus riders the world over is on their faces, too.

The look of the bus stops is a bit different, however. Instead of sporting ads or graffiti, they appear to be very clean and feature landscapes or cityscapes, often with beautiful scenery.

Buses are by far the most common means of public transport in the capital of around three million people, where access to private cars is rare, and they offer an extensive network of coverage. Tickets cost 5 won each, less than 0.1 U.S. cents at free-market rates, making journeys virtually free.

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